February 2012

Universities and Internationalization

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In preparing some advance press for a news item, I was interviewing a faculty member about her Fulbright experience earlier this week and it brought us around to a wider discussion about students and faculty going abroad. Our university and Franklin College very much encourage international experiences and collaborations. The art exhibition that was the focus of my interview offers a case in point of the benefits therein: an international, collaborative project, facilitated by an existing and very successful mechanism (the Fulbright Scholarship Program), which the faculty member will then propel forward by encouraging colleagues and students to apply.

But it is important to remember that there are other points of view about internationalization, as elaborated in this post in the Chronicle:

The Onus of Responsibility

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Interim dean Hugh Ruppersburg addressed the UGA chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in December, 2011 on the thread of responsibility running through Arthur Miller's All My Sons, the scandal at Penn State and the future of these UGA graduates:

Arthur Miller’s play is about men who fail to do what is right, about a man whose desire to protect his name and his business causes the death of his own son and of other American young men fighting in the Second World War. Joe Keller loses his son because he allows profit motives to corrode and destroy basic human values. When his surviving son calls him a murderer, the accusation is not unjust. “You can be better,” Chris chastises his mother at play’s end when she asks him what more than sorry can she and Joe be for how events have turned out. “Once and for all you can know there’s a universe of people outside and you’re responsible to it, and unless you know that, you threw away your son because that’s why he died.”

Stonehenge at LDSOA

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In Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy described the solitude of Stonehenge:

 ‘What can it be? … A very Temple of the Winds’ … ‘It seems as though there were no folk in the world but we two’ … they … listened a long time to the wind among the pillars … Presently the wind died out, and the quivering little pools in the cup-like hollows of the stones lay still."

Franklin Dean Finalists Announced

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When former dean Garnett Stokes stepped down this past August to become provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Florida State University, senior associate dean Hugh Ruppersburg was named interim dean of the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. A longtime faculty member with vast institutional knowledge of Franklin College as well as a noted scholar of American film and literature, Ruppersburg has taken on the role of dean quite naturally. We are indebted to him for representing the College in such a forward-looking and effective manner. Meanwhile the University of Georgia is also moving forward to find a permanent dean for Franklin College; the finalists in the search have been announced and each will make presentations to the university community in February:

A search committee, chaired by Thomas Lauth, dean of UGA's School of Public and International Affairs, conducted a national search to identify the finalists.

The committee was assisted by UGA's Executive and Faculty Search Group.

Minding the Gender Wage Gap

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Greatly under-estimated in the 1980's, the gap in wages between men and women has decreased sharply over the past three decades. A new University of Georgia study reveals that the gap shrank more dramatically than previously recognized.

Thomas Dozol, Works on Paper

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The Lamar Dodd School of Art presents an exhibition by visual artist Thomas Dozol, in the Plaza Gallery through Feb. 22.

Here's an interview with Dozol I did before the show, talking about the inspiration and influences behind the work.

 

 

Tree of Life

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Evolutionary biology is the 10-meter spring board for some of the greatest questions in science and epidemiology. How do species arise? How do genes diversify and acquire new functions? How do pathogens evolve and how does that information lead to new and better understanding of diseases?

Pirates of Penzance

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The Hugh Hodgson School of Music Opera Ensemble presents The Pirates of Penzance Feb. 17-19 at the Fine Arts Theatre.

First performed in New York City on New Year’s Eve in 1879, The Pirates of Penzance is a comedic, family-friendly tale of British pirates and policemen, and love and leap years. It features some of Gilbert and Sullivan’s most famous songs, including “I am the very model of a modern Major-General.” 

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