Category: International

Study Abroad Fair Oct. 9-10

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In 1970, there were two study abroad programs at UGA - the Classics program in Rome and Lamar Dodd School of Art program in Cortona. Now, there are programs in [at least] 27 different locations around the world. Students can explore these opportunities for the next two days at the Study Abroad Fair in the Tate Center:

Organized by the Office of International Education, the fair will feature opportunities for students to study, intern, travel or volunteer abroad. Some 80 exhibitors will showcase programs led by UGA faculty, at UGA residential centers, at international partner universities and those offered by both external providers and other organizations involved in international education.

The fair will provide students with the opportunity to explore multiple program options, pre-departure preparation, dates and costs as well as practical information about pursuing academic or work experiences abroad. It is open free to the public.

"The Study Abroad Fair is a unique two-day event designed to help students get a feel for various global opportunities available to them during their time at UGA by simply browsing various tables and speaking with exhibitors," said Yana Cornish, director of education abroad in the Office of International Education. "I hope many will take advantage of this event."

In 2013, the fair attracted 85 program exhibitors representing all regions of the world and was visited by nearly 1,500 attendees.

Here's a short video of a longer documentary celebrating the Classics Program in Rome. Looks like fun.

 

 

 

Rethinking the Parthenon - symposium Oct. 17

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parthenon.jpgIt's one of the world's great iconic structures, a cultural symbol as well as an artifact and a living presence in one of the world's great metropolises. Even from a distance, the Parthenon inspires, compels and provokes as it connects past to present. All this and more awaits at an upcoming international symposium at UGA on the restoration of the great structure:

"Rethinking the Parthenon: Color, Materiality and Aesthetics" Oct. 17-18.

The international symposium will bring scholars to UGA to present recent research on the Parthenon, a temple built for the goddess Athena on the Acropolis of Athens between 447 and 432 B.C. 

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The symposium will focus on three interrelated aspects of the Parthenon: its color, its materiality and its aesthetics. New interdisciplinary research in London and on the Acropolis in Athens has uncovered remains of ancient painting on the sculptures and architecture of the Parthenon. These discoveries add new insights to old discussions of the building's decoration. The diversity of the Parthenon's construction materials, including white marble, bronze, ivory, gold and pigments are of critical importance, the complex symbolism and material aesthetics of the religious use of these materials.

Robin Osborne, a professor of ancient history at Cambridge University, will deliver the keynote speech, "The Parthenon as a Work of Art," Oct. 17 at 5:30 p.m. in the M. Smith Griffith Auditorium at the Georgia Museum of Art following a 5 p.m. reception.

The stories codified in Greek architecture are myriad and it's no surprise that more have been uncovered in the restoration at the Acropolis. Classical culture is alive in so many ways; come out and be a part of what are sure be fascinating discussions.

Hispanic Heritage Month

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choco.jpgAppreciation of the Hispanic culture that comprises such a great and growing part of the American fabric can certainly be an everyday ocurrence. But a monthlong celebration of rich cultural elements informing our campus and community is also in process, with events highlighting Hispanic Heritage Month:

The nationally recognized celebration is observed from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 and honors the many contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans in the U.S. while highlighting the diverse heritage and cultures of Latin America.

The theme for this year's observance is "A Legacy of History, a Present of Action and a Future of Success." Unless otherwise noted, the following events are open free to the public:

Sept. 30-"Ask Me About..." Students for Latin@ Empowerment will give away Mexican candy and have information about their organization available from noon to 2 p.m. on the Tate Student Center Plaza.

Oct. 1-Hispanic Scholarship Fund Celebration. The Hispanic Scholarship Fund Scholar Chapter celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month by highlighting some of the many HSF alumni who are making their mark on history. The program will be held at 6 p.m. in Room 350 of the Miller Learning Center.

Oct. 4-Fiesta. The Athens-Clarke County Library hosts stories, music, a Don Quixote skit, crafts and more from 2-4 p.m.

Oct. 7 and 9-Film Screening: Chocó by Jhonny Hendrix Hinestoza. The film tells the story of a young Colombian woman who raises her children alone by working in a gold mine. A question-and-answer session with the director will follow. Admission is $9.75 or $7.50 for students. Oct. 7 screening will be at 8 p.m. at Ciné. The Oct. 9 screening will be at 6 p.m. at the Georgia Museum of Art.

Oct. 8-Film Screening: Cesar Chavez. The film looks at the American farm worker, labor leader and civil rights activist who co-founded the National Farm Workers Association. The screening will be held at 7 p.m. in the Tate Student Center Theatre.

Oct. 11-ALCES Open House. The Athens Latino Center for Education and Services showcases the various services offered to the Hispanic population in North Georgia. There will be food, music and door prizes from
1:30-4 p.m. at ALCES, which is located at 445 Huntington Road.

Oct. 11-Pueblos Originarios: Un Festival Artesanal. Arts and crafts inspired by the indigenous peoples of the Americas as well as food and music from all over Latin America will be showcased from 1-5 p.m. at the Pinewoods Library and Learning Center, 465 U.S. Highway 29 North.

Oct. 12-Book Fiesta With Lucha Libre. Share stories and make a luchador mask from 3-4 p.m. at the Athens-Clarke County Library.

More events at the the link. Franklin's LACSI and the romance languages department lead the way in planning these important celebrations and we are fortunate to have these vibrant organizations that both draw great students and faculty to campus and broaden the academic environment to more accurately reflect American values. Come out and enjoy some of these events, which cross into music, language, art, literature, food and film just like Hispanic culture does in real life. Voila, no boundaries at all.

Speaking and Listening: Romance Linguistics colloquium

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Make-a-Water-Drop-Sound.jpgIf you had to learn to speak Italian or Spanish with only a dictionary, could you do it? Phonemes are distinct units of sound in a specified language that distinguish one word from another, for example p, b, d, and t in the English words pad, pat, bad, and bat. So... consonants are one thing, but vowels can be a completely different story. You have to love this stuff and our Romance Languages faculty does. On Thursday at 4 p.m. in Gilbert 115, the department presents a Romance Linguistics colloquium featuring assitant professor of linguistics Peggy Renwick:

“Phonological closeness between phonetically distinct vowel phonemes”

Standard Italian has seven vowels: /i e ɛ a o ɔ u/. But how strong is the distinction between /e/ vs. /ɛ/ and /o/ vs. /ɔ/? Do people really speak like the dictionary prescribes? Our study investigates the validity of the conventional descriptions of Italian and probes the correspondence between speakers’ productions and their intuitions, with the ultimate aim of understanding how such cases can be incorporated into theories of phonological contrast and historical change.

Just so. More information on Dr. Renwick's work here. Language is a wonderfully, maddeningly evolving tool that gives force to our thoughts and voice to our emotions. It is the path to comprehending the world, yourself and your place in the world - even if you only speak one language. The best we can do is to continue to improve our understanding of its power. How does that sound?

Bella.

2014-15 Fulbright grants

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Of the twelve University of Georgia students who were awarded international travel-study grants from the Fulbright U.S. Student Program for the 2014-2015 academic year, the Franklin College is well represented:

This is UGA's second highest total of Fulbright recipients.

Eight of the students accepted the scholarships. Recipients of the U.S. Student Full Grants, which cover research, study and creative opportunities, include three students who recently earned undergraduate degrees at UGA: 2013 graduate Christian Conroy of Roswell; 2011 graduate Winn Davis of Savannah; and 2009 graduate Brett Heimlich of Alpharetta.

Two students who recently earned master's degrees at UGA also received Full Grants: Sara Hobe of Fresno, California; and Lauren Satterfield of Atlanta.

English Teaching Assistantship Grants, which place recipients in K-12 schools and universities to serve as language-learning assistants, were given to three students who recently earned undergraduate degrees at UGA: Tiffany Brown of Warner Robbins, DeAnne Cantrell of Douglasville, and Christine Pardue of Cleveland.

The largest U.S. international exchange program, Fulbright grants allow our students to work in communties throughout the world while continuing their education.

Pavlic on Palestine

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Creative writing professor and poet Ed Pavlić just returned from the West Bank, where he toured the region with other writers as well as government and NGO officials. He offers some poignant observations about the current conflict in this piece for Africa Is A Country:

I know. It’s the oldest of old hats to note the distended shapes American journalism creates to preserve the Israel-first, false impression of some symmetry or parity between interests and powers in the contested territory split, shared, and struggled over by people known as Palestinians and Israelis. Even the names are disputed. Many Palestinians would refute the idea of “Israelis” and simply say Jews. Many Israelis have contended that, in fact, there are no “Palestinian” people. It’s territory—rhetorical, ethical, religious, ethnic, and geographic—so complexly, at times, hideously, contested that many people in the West, certainly in the U.S., simply look away. As a person who, since childhood, has lived a life athwart American racial codes and territories, I’ve always kept an eye on Israel / Palestine for the focused, if challenging, clarity it can offer one’s perspective on American experience. That might sound strange. But, it’s true. In a recent tour of the West Bank with the Palestinian Festival of Literature, in fact, I found much clarified.

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There’s active and latent anger and violence everywhere in the region. But, according to these sources, even in so-called “Palestinian” territory (occupied by and often under the control of Israeli military personnel), there’s absolutely no parity in the legal, military, and social contests between Israeli power and Palestinian struggle. One is a contemporary bureaucratic state whose legal system vigorously operates to sustain and increase its hold on geographic territory and is possessed of a cornucopia of surveillance and weapon systems to back it up. The other is a disparate array of factionalized, anti-colonial resistance that uses smuggled and home-built weapons when not employing such high-tech systems as slingshots and cutlasses or simply throwing stones. Simply put there’s no contest here.

Friends of Israel do it no favors with our silence. The crisis continues, with news harder to come by as journalism suffers beneath its own conventions. Thanks to Pavlić for trying to elucidate some of the underlying conditions. Be sure and read the whole thing.

Exploring UGA's global connections

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DiscoverUGA.jpgHaving spent some time recently with one of our terrific (and longest-running) study abroad programs, I can vouch for the impact they have on our students. The echo of these experiences reverberate back on campus, in our classrooms, in the lives of our students as they resume their studies back in Athens, and in the host countries and cities our programs call home (away from home).

To get an even better idea of this multiverse of scholarly engagement, our colleagues in UGA public affairs put together a terrific interactive map that documents what our students and faculty are doing around the globe. Take a look

Kagel on ZDF TV

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MK_tv.jpgEven during the summer, our faculty are in great demand in the media - at home and abroad. Martin Kagel, A.G. Steer Professor and head of the department of German and Slavic Studies, was recently featured as an expert on a documetary broadcast on German television (SAT3/ZDF), the primary German public television channel for arts programming. The subject of the documentary was the 100th birthday of the German-Jewish writer, George Tabori. Kagel and theatre and film studies depertment head David Saltz are planning a conference on Tabori and Holocaust theater in general for February, 2015. Stay tuned. 

Discover UGA Abroad - Austraila

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man jumping on rocksIt is the time of year when so many of our students are expanding their academic horizons around the globe. From Costa Rica to Zanzibar, our classrooms are taking the shape of the world. Just yesterday, I ran into a colleague who had just returned from teaching in one of our programs and he was excited about maymester in Australia:

The program begins with several days in Sydney, considered one of the world’s best cities to live and play, taking classes and local field trips with UGA faculty and Australian experts. In Sydney, we visit iconic places including the Opera House, Harbor Bridge, and Darling Harbor, head to Bondi or Manly beach to explore heritage and tourism conservation, as well as take a free day for independent exploration. We then head north to Queensland for our field trips: We stay on an isolated island eco-resort on the Great Barrier Reef, travel to Noosa and the Sunshine Coast to explore sustainable development and ecotourism issues, visit the Outback at Carnarvon Gorge, and travel to the Gondwanaland rainforest at Lamington National Park. We finish the program in Brisbane, one of Australia’s most vibrant and modern cities. One of the unique features of the program is the activities we have along the way: Snorkel the Great Barrier Reef, experience Aboriginal bush life, discover koalas and kangaroos, and hike tropical rainforests, as well as receive guided tours of Sydney and Brisbane.

This sounds like a great experience blending travel with learning - one open to all students, with opportunities for undergraduate, graduate and honors students in Anthropology, Biology, Ecology, Forestry and Natural Resources, Foods and Nutrition, Geography, International Affairs, and Recreation and Leisure Studies. Discover UGA in Australia. 

REFOCUS program benefits students, scientists

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Projectfocuslogo2_000.jpgMore great news today for the future of STEM-related careers. Veteran scientists and engineers will share their love of science and math with the next generation through a program known as REFOCUS.  The program will train professionals to work with teachers in Clarke and six surrounding counties to provide regular science and math enrichment activities to students. 

The program is meant to help students in K-12 understand math and science concepts and expose them to new STEM career choices for the future. The program is based on a program that’s been in place at UGA for the past 12 years.  David Knauft, a professor of horticulture in the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, began a program called FOCUS in which UGA students studying STEM subjects were paired with elementary and middle school teachers in Clarke County.

REFOCUS will expand on the Project FOCUS framework, allowing science, technology, engineering and math mentors to be in even more Clarke County classrooms and in classrooms in surrounding counties.

"For quite some time, we have wanted to expand Project FOCUS to include graduate students, postdocs, faculty and retired scientists," said David Knauft, professor of horticulture in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and STEM education advocate. "Thanks to this AAAS funding, we will be able to do so.

"Also, because these individuals have more flexible schedules, we hope to bring REFOCUS to nearby counties, something we haven't been able to do with Project FOCUS."

Another great example of collaboration, between disciplines at UGA and between UGA and area school systems.  Knauft worked with the Clarke County School District; Julie Luft, the Athletic Association Professor of Mathematics and Science Education in the UGA College of Education; and Chuck Kutal, associate dean of the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, to secure a $14,800 grant from American Association for the Advancement of Science to help develop the REFOCUS program.  

The REFOCUS project will start recruiting its first class of STEM mentors this summer and debut the program in Clarke County classrooms this fall.

To get involved in Project REFOCUS, contact Knauft atdknauft@uga.edu.  For more information on Project FOCUS, see www.focus.uga.edu.