Category: Classics

Linguistics PhD grad wins international dissertation prize

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MUnze.gifCongratulations to Dr. Mark Wenthe, currently a parttime instructor at UGA and also a recent PhD alumnus in linguistics in the department of classics, who won an international competition for best dissertation for the year 2013 from the Society of Indo-European Studies (Indogermanische Gesellschaft).

Wenthe's dissertation, ISSUES IN THE PLACEMENT OF ENCLITIC PERSONAL PRONOUNS IN THE RIGVEDA, among the four canonical sacred texts (śruti) of Hinduism known as the Vedas, actually shared the award with Konstantinos Sampanis from the Univ. of Salzburg (Austria). Both scholars received full marks for their work.

Congratulations as well to Jared S. Klein, professor of linguistics, classics, and Germanic and Slavic languages director, program in linguistics in the department of classics. Our scholars are making an impact around the world, as their work is celebrated, noted and honored. Congratulationd again on this outstanding achievement.

Study Abroad Fair Oct. 9-10

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In 1970, there were two study abroad programs at UGA - the Classics program in Rome and Lamar Dodd School of Art program in Cortona. Now, there are programs in [at least] 27 different locations around the world. Students can explore these opportunities for the next two days at the Study Abroad Fair in the Tate Center:

Organized by the Office of International Education, the fair will feature opportunities for students to study, intern, travel or volunteer abroad. Some 80 exhibitors will showcase programs led by UGA faculty, at UGA residential centers, at international partner universities and those offered by both external providers and other organizations involved in international education.

The fair will provide students with the opportunity to explore multiple program options, pre-departure preparation, dates and costs as well as practical information about pursuing academic or work experiences abroad. It is open free to the public.

"The Study Abroad Fair is a unique two-day event designed to help students get a feel for various global opportunities available to them during their time at UGA by simply browsing various tables and speaking with exhibitors," said Yana Cornish, director of education abroad in the Office of International Education. "I hope many will take advantage of this event."

In 2013, the fair attracted 85 program exhibitors representing all regions of the world and was visited by nearly 1,500 attendees.

Here's a short video of a longer documentary celebrating the Classics Program in Rome. Looks like fun.

 

 

 

Rethinking the Parthenon - symposium Oct. 17

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parthenon.jpgIt's one of the world's great iconic structures, a cultural symbol as well as an artifact and a living presence in one of the world's great metropolises. Even from a distance, the Parthenon inspires, compels and provokes as it connects past to present. All this and more awaits at an upcoming international symposium at UGA on the restoration of the great structure:

"Rethinking the Parthenon: Color, Materiality and Aesthetics" Oct. 17-18.

The international symposium will bring scholars to UGA to present recent research on the Parthenon, a temple built for the goddess Athena on the Acropolis of Athens between 447 and 432 B.C. 

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The symposium will focus on three interrelated aspects of the Parthenon: its color, its materiality and its aesthetics. New interdisciplinary research in London and on the Acropolis in Athens has uncovered remains of ancient painting on the sculptures and architecture of the Parthenon. These discoveries add new insights to old discussions of the building's decoration. The diversity of the Parthenon's construction materials, including white marble, bronze, ivory, gold and pigments are of critical importance, the complex symbolism and material aesthetics of the religious use of these materials.

Robin Osborne, a professor of ancient history at Cambridge University, will deliver the keynote speech, "The Parthenon as a Work of Art," Oct. 17 at 5:30 p.m. in the M. Smith Griffith Auditorium at the Georgia Museum of Art following a 5 p.m. reception.

The stories codified in Greek architecture are myriad and it's no surprise that more have been uncovered in the restoration at the Acropolis. Classical culture is alive in so many ways; come out and be a part of what are sure be fascinating discussions.

Exploring UGA's global connections

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DiscoverUGA.jpgHaving spent some time recently with one of our terrific (and longest-running) study abroad programs, I can vouch for the impact they have on our students. The echo of these experiences reverberate back on campus, in our classrooms, in the lives of our students as they resume their studies back in Athens, and in the host countries and cities our programs call home (away from home).

To get an even better idea of this multiverse of scholarly engagement, our colleagues in UGA public affairs put together a terrific interactive map that documents what our students and faculty are doing around the globe. Take a look

Ancient Medicine and the Modern Physician

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Asclepius_Rhodes_wipad.jpgThe classics department in collaboration with the Georgia Regents University/UGA Medical Partnership, will host a two-day symposium designed to find relevant historical practices that are useful to modern-day physicians:

Events will be held March 23-24 on both the UGA main campus and the Health Sciences Campus. Experts in ancient medicine and modern medical practices will present workshops, panel discussions and a keynote address.

"Methods of diagnosis are undergoing fundamental changes within American medical communities," said Nancy Felson, professor emerita in the classics department and one of the event organizers. "Physicians and other health care professionals now recognize that successful diagnosis is not only a matter of identifying symptoms, but rather an interpretive process involving the narrative arc of a patient's life, activities, habits, gene profile as well as the exhibited symptoms. This new and fundamental aspect of modern health care is rooted in ancient medical methods of diagnosis and patient narratives."

The symposium will begin March 23 with a 7 p.m. lecture in George Hall on the Health Sciences Campus.

Dr. Richard Panico will discuss "The Art of Medicine: It's Always Been About the Dialogue." A reception will follow his talk.

For more information, visit the classics website. Great subject for discussion, and very important to engage the himanities with the study of medicine and vice versa.

Women of the Early Christian World

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BAND OF ANGELS.jpgThroughout the course of the 20th century and increasingly so now in the 21st, women are playing a much more prominent role in society. Whether you view this as finally just or only an indication that our society still has a great distance to travel to achieve gender equity, some perspective on the past can be instructive about where we are and how much has changed. The department of classics is sponsoring a lecture next Friday, Nov. 15 that should lend greater perspective on this important subject:

Kate Cooper, Professor of Ancient History at the University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, will present a lecture, "The Women of Early Christian Africa," which identifies influential roles Christian women played in the first and second centuries. The lecture is in conjuntion with the release of her new book, BAND OF ANGELS: THE FORGOTTEN WORLD OF EARLY CHRISTIAN WOMEN.

Cooper's lecture will be held on November 15 at 6:30 pm in 101 Miller Student Learning Center. A reception will follow in the Fourth Floor Rotunda. Copies of the book will be available.

The event is free and open to the public.

We look forward to this discussion and applaud the department of classics, which sponsors a number of scholarly lectures scheduled throughout the year. 

Stonehenge at LDSOA

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In Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy described the solitude of Stonehenge:

 ‘What can it be? … A very Temple of the Winds’ … ‘It seems as though there were no folk in the world but we two’ … they … listened a long time to the wind among the pillars … Presently the wind died out, and the quivering little pools in the cup-like hollows of the stones lay still."