Category: scholarship

Engaging the Public: A workshop on communicating your research

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Because our office is constantly engaged with this, communicating about research and scholarship is a near and dear priority. And of course, as the Franklin College, we are home to so many great scholars and scientists that it is must that we share this expertise as widely as possible.

But communicating with the public, and especially the media, can be a challenge. Now the Graduate School is organizing a workshop series designed to help our faculty communicate their work more effectively.

To help faculty members develop and practice those skills, The Graduate School, OVPR, Provost’s Office, Public Affairs, Grady College, and Department of Theatre and Film Studies are again presenting a two-part workshop on Engaging the Public. Applications are now open.

Session One: Tuesday, March 25th, 1pm-4pm
Session Two: Thursday, March 27th, 1pm-4pm

**You MUST be able to attend both sessions to participate

ACTION
Participation is extremely limited. To be considered, please email Meredith Welch-Devine (mwdevine@uga.edu) by 5pm on March 4th with the following information:
1) Your name and department Your name and department Your name and department Your name and departmentYour name and department Your name and department Your name and department Your name and department
2) Your area of research expertise
3) A brief rationale that explains why it is important for you to be chosen for this training
4) Confirmation that you would be able to attend both sessions of the workshop in their entirety
The training group will be selected for diversity across represented departments and career stages. Applicants will be notified of selection decisions by March 7th.
For further information on this workshop, contact the Director of Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs, Dr. Meredith Welch-Devine.
▪ Email: mwdevine@uga.edu

A separate set of workshops on the topic for graduate students and post-docs is scheduled for March 18 and 20. For more information and to apply, go here.

Music Scholarship: Power in the Progress

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The Hugh Hodgson School of Music is renowned for training some of the best conductors, vocalists, cellists, violinists and other instrumental performers in the country. Many of these UGA graduates go on to outstanding international careers and we take great pride in their accomplishments. The Hodgson School also trains some of the best music teachers in America and its impact on the future of the arts in the classroom is at least as important as bringing some of the world's most beautiful music to campus. Indeed these are not exclusive of each other and function wonderfully together. But it's important to note that progress in the classroom hinges on scholarship, as this article from Hodgson school alum Josh Boyd illustrates, UGA music scholars continue to uncover methods for helping students to higher levels of musicianship:

"Power in the Progress System" created by H. Dwight Satterwhite, a professor at the University of Georgia is based on the idea that students will exceed expectations when they have an incentive program that provides constant positive reinforcement as well as a clearly charted path to success.

Sounds simple enough. But it takes a great amount of engagement with teaching to get to a point where one can explain something that sounds obvious. The article lays out the steps of the program and importantly how it "revolutionized our band program" at a middle school in Georgia, one venue among thousands where some of our alums do their best work.

* Thanks to the commenter. Article previously referred to another HHSOM Josh Byrd instead of the correct alum, Joshua Boyd. Apologies.

Biesecker wins Francine Merritt Award

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The Francine Merritt Award or Outstanding Contributions to the Lives of Women in Communication, presented by the National Communication Association's (NCA) Women's Caucus, honors the memory of Francine Merritt, who taught at Louisiana State University between 1947 and 1984. Congratulations to the 2013 Francine Merritt Award winner, professor and head of the department of communication studies, Barbara Biesecker:

Dr. Biesecker's commitment to the Women's Causus' goal of "exploring the diversity and complexities of women's lives" is evident in her research. Former Chair of the Women's Caucus, UGA Distinguished Professor and COMM faculty member Dr. Celeste Condit noted in her letter of support that Dr. Biesecker "has clearly been and continues to be an important figure in the progress of feminist and women's studies scholarship in communication" and she 'is recognized as a leader (perhaps the leader) in a realm of abstract theory." Incoming President of NCA Dr. Lynn Turner noted that Dr. Biesecker's scholarship reveals her "continual efforts to bring both women and feminist perspectives to rhetorical history" and draws "attention to the significatn influences on and by women." Dr. Biesecker's scholarship has been the focus of a spotlight panel at the Southern States Communication Association Annual Conference called "Shifting Scenes: Rhetoric/Feminism/Postmodernism," earned her the Douglas Ehninger Distinguished Rhetorical Scholar Award, and contributed to her selection as the newest Editor of the Quarterly Journal of Speech - making her only the fifth women to serve in that role during the last century.

As her colleagues note at the link, Dr. Biesecker works tirelessly as a mentor to further the careers of women in the field of communication. For this alone we are in her debt, though her dedication as an educator and scholar put her in the position to be such a positive influence and source of support for her colleagues. Congratulations on on this particular award, which brings great distinction to UGA and the Franklin College.

2013 Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship

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Congratulations to computer science grad student Jennifer Rouan, who has been awarded a prestigious Google scholarship:

Rouan recently received the 2013 Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship, an award that honors its namesake by encouraging women to excel in computing and technology.

Borg was a computer scientist who devoted her life to revolutionizing perceptions of technology and dismantling barriers that keep women and minorities from entering computing and technology fields. The Google scholarship—worth $10,000 for the 2013-14 academic year—also encourages women to become active role models and leaders in these fields.

UGA’s Rouan, a master’s degree student in the Franklin College of Arts and Science’s department of computer science, also was selected for the 2013 Google Student Veterans of America Scholarship. Recipients of Google scholarships can accept only one of the awards.

“I’m very excited to have won both scholarships, but as a woman in tech I identify with Anita Borg and her impact on our field,” Rouan said. “And, so, being part of that memory is an important part of my own life philosophy.”
 

Fantastic - two Google scholarships. Difficult to verify, but we think Jennifer is the first UGA student to be selected for both awards. Big congratulations to her, Thiab Taha, and the computer science department.

Image: Women-inspired Google doodle honoring Anita Borg, Grace Hopper and Lada Ada Lovelace

2013 Lecture on Scholarly Communication

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library column pedimentsThe UGA Librairies presents a lecture by Kenneth D. Crews, director of the Copyright Advisory Office at Columbia University in New York City, "Copyright and the Academy: The Battle turns to the Courts," on Monday May 20 at 10 am in 271 Auditorium of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries. Crews will discuss recent U.S. court decisions that shape fair use for higher education:

For many years, universities and some copyright owners have sparred over interpretations of fair use and other critical provisions of the law. The disagreements have been played out in congressional hearings, negotiations over guidelines and efforts by leading organizations to influence policymaking at educational institutions. The debates have been robust, but ultimately more of a standoff than a true clash of powers. Much has changed in recent years. Cases involving copyright and education are heading to the courts. The litigation is costly and demanding, but it also is a chance to learn for the first time the view of the courts about the state of copyright law in higher education. The recent court ruling about fair use at Georgia State University is a leading of example. However, cases are also challenging videostreaming at UCLA, the preservation of digital books at the University of Michigan and even the ability of libraries to keep foreign books and other materials in their collections. This presentation will offer insights into these cases and pending developments in Congress. It will also examine reasons why the copyright issues that were once the domain of respectful agreement have escalated into litigation. 

Free and open to the public (and very informative).

Image: Columns at the Richard B. Russell Building, courtesy of UGA photographic services

Study in a second discipline

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Careers in academia are, in some ways, like those of any other profession: once you have secured a position, you set about to address professional obligations, establish personal goals and pursue opportunities for advancement. Most of all of these would occur within the framework of the position for which you were intially hired.

An important difference in the professoriat, and one emphasized by a program at UGA, is the opportunity to study outside of your chosen discipline. The 2013-2014 Study in a Second Discipline Fellows were just announced and they are all from the Franklin College:

"Some of the most notable research and scholarship occurs at the interface of fields, and the Study in the Second Discipline program is one of the many ways that the university encourages interdisciplinary research," said Provost Jere Morehead. "I commend the recipients of this fellowship for undertaking projects that will advance their fields and have the potential to foster long-term collaborations on campus."

The 2013-2014 Fellows are:

  • Benjamin Ehlers, associate professor of history, who will study in the geography department to gain proficiency in data mapping and further his research into patterns of religious violence in the Spanish Mediterranean;
  • Chad Howe, associate professor of Romance languages, who will study in the department of statistics with the goal of applying advanced quantitative techniques to the study of language variation;
  • Amy Ross, associate professor of geography, who will study in the departments of philosophy and military science to advance her research on civilian casualties and lay the foundation for a new course on "The Geographies of Conflict." 
  • Janice Simon, Meigs Professor of Art History, who will study Native American culture in the anthropology department to broaden the scope of her research on landscape images as well as her courses on American art;
  • Robert Varley, professor of mathematics, who will study in the physics department to enhance collaborative research on particle physics and quantum field theory; and
  • Andrew Zawacki, associate professor of English, who will study photography in the Lamar Dodd School of Art and incorporate the technical and theoretical knowledge he gains into an upcoming book of poetry.

Congratulations to these faculty members, and thanks to their colleagues in every department for supporting their return to the classoom in a different guise. We look forward to the fruits of their study in a second discipline and salute the dedication to innovative scholarship.

Focus on Faculty: William Finlay

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finlay-william, with students, looking at a computer.Sociology professor and department head William Finlay is currently featured in the Focus on Faculty on the UGA homepage:

A few highlights/insights on Finlay's perspective on teaching:

What interests you about your field?

I enjoy its diversity and the sheer range of human behaviors and institutions that one can examine and explain as a sociologist. It remains as fascinating a discipline to me now as it did when I took my first undergraduate sociology class nearly 40 years ago.

What are some highlights of your career at UGA?

Becoming a Meigs professor, receiving an award from one of the sections of the American Sociological Association for my first book, and starting a study-abroad program in South Africa.

How does your research or scholarship inspire your teaching, and vice versa?

For me, they've also gone hand in hand. My current research project is a direct outgrowth of a class I have been teaching – I often get ideas for research from teaching. And when I'm working on my research, I often think about how I would present the findings to students, which I find to be a good way of forcing myself to make the argument as clear and interesting as possible.

What do you hope students gain from their classroom experience with you?

A set of concepts and ideas for understanding the world around them, whether they are at home, at work or visiting unfamiliar places. I like to think of sociology as a kind of toolkit that we can use to explain human behavior and I hope that my students take some of these tools with them.

Be sure and read the whole thing.

Image: University of Georgia. Finlay, right, with students.

Fallows book selected for international award

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A monograph by professor of romance languages and associate dean in the Franklin College Noel Fallows has been selected for the prestigious La corónica International Book Award:

La corónica is a refereed journal published every spring and fall by the Modern Language Association's Division on Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. It publishes groundbreaking articles written in English or Spanish on topics in medieval Spanish cultural studies, literature, and historical linguistics. Devoted to Hispanomedievalism in its broadest sense, La corónica also welcomes scholarship that transcends the linguistic and/or cultural borders of Spanish and explores the interconnectedness of those languages and cultures that coexisted in medieval Iberia.

Fallows' book, Jousting in Medieval and Renaissance Iberia is "a handsomely produced and beautifully illustrated book" that "through a thoughtful deployment of texts and images, takes us into the complex social and cultural world of late medieval and early modern chivalry." (The Medieval Review)

Associate dean Fallows was also recently elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. Fallows reports that it has been a career-long ambition to be invited to join the SAL, which is very estimed in Bristich scholarly circles though has few 'foreign' Fellows. Congratulations to Fallows on these terrific awards honoring his scholarship and writing.

Boren Scholars earn study abroad opportunities

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Five UGA undergraduates werenamed 2012-13 NSEP Boren Scholars for study abroad - three of them from the Franklin College:

Five University of Georgia undergraduates-a record number-will be spending the next academic year participating in language study abroad programs thanks to the National Security Education Program David L. Boren Undergraduate Scholarship.

The UGA Boren Scholars are juniors Tia Ayele of Stone Mountain, Malena Lopez-Sotelo of Rentz and John Esteban Rodriguez of Guyton, and seniors Christian Conroy of Roswell and David Gutiérrez of Albany.

Dean's Council Scholarship

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Sophomore biology and psychology double major Mehreen Sultana has been awarded the very first Dean's Council Scholarship:

The $1,000 scholarship is funded by an endowment created by the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Dean's Council, an advisory group of alumni and donors committed to advancing the university's oldest, largest and most academically diverse college.