Category: students

First-Year Odyssey: an intro to careers

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FYO_vet.jpgIn a query in the form of a comment to a recent post, a prosective UGA student asked about the Franklin College and what role, as a prospective veterinary student, Franklin would play in their education. It's a good question.

A very significant role, actually. Aside from its importance to the core curriculum for a host of majors beyond Franklin, preparing students for study in a wide variety of fields and professional schools, the arts and sciences educate us about society in a way that will impact everything we do, whatever our field. The First-Year Odyssey program offers a case in point on this experience:

First-Year Odyssey seminars are designed to introduce students to academic life at UGA, allowing them to engage with faculty and other first-year students in a small class environment. 
In this seminar, Ward, a professor of internal medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine and chief medical officer for small animal medicine, asks students to explore how pets are part of society and what responsibility people have to their pets. But the course also gives students a chance to see and interact with animals.
There were plenty of adoring "oohs" and "ahs" from the class of 15 students as they toured the existing Veterinary Teaching Hospital with Ward and got to see animals of various sizes receiving treatment. The students were especially excited in the large animal wing of the hospital when they found a sick calf taking solace with its mother in a stall.
But the tour wasn't just about looking at sick animals. Students also were introduced to the wide-ranging specialties in veterinary medicine. Ward said there are nearly as many medical specialties in treating animals as there are in people medicine-including cardiology, anesthesiology, orthopedics and neurology.
While one function of the class is to get students to think deeply about human-animal interaction in society, it's also an opportunity for students to explore careers that deal with animals. 
Elizabeth Davis, a biological science major from Adairsville, grew up on a farm with chickens, goats and horses. She is considering career options with animals beyond being a veterinarian.
As she has found out in the class, there are many options.
"I've learned a lot about being a vet and other careers," she said.

Precisely so. Hands-on experience with a variety of subject matter allows students to think broadly about their future, even if they have already decided on a career. Refining our ideas about what we want to do and the best route for our talents is one of the great luxuries [and responsibilities] students enjoy at UGA. The Franklin College plays a crucial role in thse opportunities, providing the space and breadth of faculty expertise for your imagination to roam - and your perceptions to sharpen.

Transgender Awareness Week

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The transgender community is an important constituency that helps inform institutional diversity efforts on campus - not unlike many other groups on campus. Where they differ significantly from other groups, however, is the threat of violence that transgender individuals face on a far too consistent basis. To bring added attention to this situation, the University of Georgia Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center will observe Transgender Awareness Week with several events Nov. 18-20:

Transgender activist Luna Merbruja will conduct a workshop titled "Liberation From The Margins: How To Fight Racial, Gender, and Queer Violence" on Nov. 18 at 2 p.m. in Room 141 of the Tate Student Center. The workshop will focus on the struggles and violence that queer, transgender and/or people of color face in their homes, workplaces and intimate relationships.

Participants will be given an opportunity to share their experiences of survival, resistance and strategies to address violence, as well as skill sharing to create communities that support one another.

Merbruja will deliver a keynote monologue at 6:30 p.m. in Room B2 of the main library. The performance will be dedicated to the memory of activist Sylvia Rivera and other transgender women of color who fought for liberation.

The performance will illustrate how four decades of resilience has created a platform for queer and transgender liberation to permeate mainstream culture, in which there are visible queer and transgender people of color on news channels, in network series, in magazines and on the New York Times Best Seller list.

See the link for information on more events this week. The LGBT Resource Center does important work in our campus community and the Franklin College supports all efforts to make our community more inclusive. Take advantage of some of these wonderful opportunities this week to learn, acknowledge and celebrate.

Georgia Debate Union wins Virginia tournament

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Feinberg_Boyce_0.jpgA two-person UGA team-Amy Feinberg of Canton, an international affairs and public relations major, and Tucker Boyce of Alpharetta, an economics major - compiled a 9-1 record and emerged victorious at an intercollegiate debate tournament featuring 32 teams from East Coast colleges hosted by Liberty University in early November. The competition included teams from Boston College, Emory University, University of Florida, Georgetown University, University of Kentucky, University of Minnesota, U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, Vanderbilt University and Wake Forest University.

This was Feinberg and Boyce's fourth tournament of the season. They have compiled an overall record of 23-12. Their next tournament will be at Wake Forest University, typically the largest intercollegiate debate competition of the fall semester.

"It was great to see Amy and Tucker win a tournament that attracted some of the best debate programs on the East Coast," said Edward Panetta, professor of communication studies and director of the Georgia Debate Union. "They have worked hard with their coaches since early August, and it paid off with a string of solid victories.

"Any time a team wins nine of 10 debates at one tournament, it is a significant accomplishment."

Feinberg and Boyce defeated teams from Florida, Wake Forest and Georgetown on their way to victory. Feinberg also was recognized as the sixth best speaker at the tournament. Congratulations - great job, great students.

Dance students to premiere choreography at 2014 Senior Exit Concert

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Senior Exit Poster 2014.jpgThe UGA department of dance will present the 2014 Senior Exit Dance Concert on November 12-14 at 8 p.m. in the New Dance Theater in the Dance Building on Sanford Drive.  The Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department presents this three-day event as part of the university's Spotlight on the Arts Festival.

The senior showcase is a demonstration of the unique artistic talents of the department of dance's senior bachelor’s degree candidates. Seniors Mollie Henry, Kalela Massey, Mirna Minkov, and Emi Murata will premiere their works at this week’s performances. 

In addition to creating works, the seniors will also be performing in their peers’ choreographic premieres. The work featured in the concert reflects each choreographer’s individual background and movement vocabulary, promising an evening of contemporary dance that is sure to delight. 

Advanced tickets are available for purchase at www.pac.uga.edu or via phone at 706-542-4400. Tickets are also available for purchase in person at the Tate Student Center ticket counter, Monday through Friday, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. with cash, personal check, Bulldog Bucks, or major credit card. Tickets are also available at the door beginning at 7:00 p.m. before each performance. General admission ticket prices are $8 for students/seniors and $12 for adults. Because of limited seating for the three nights of performances, advance purchase is strongly recommended.

For more information on the Senior Exit Concert, please contact the department of dance at 706-542-4415 or visit www.dance.uga.edu. For more information on Spotlight on the Arts visit www.arts.uga.edu.

Criminal Justice Day at Griffin

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320px-Col-Johnson-Liberating-an-Unfortunate-Debtor.jpgCrime and its punishments continue to evolve in the U.S., and the UGA-Griffin campus will hold an informative conference this Friday, "After Mass Incarceration: Charting a Path to the Future," that will offer a look at promising trends in society as well for professionals in the field:

[The conference] will provide an opportunity for professionals from varied areas of criminal justice—law enforcement, law and the courts, corrections and the faith community—to convene and discuss these reforms and their impact on communities and to suggest alternatives to incarceration. Registration is free, but seating is limited.

"State budgets are straining, and recidivism rates have been virtually unaffected after decades of prison population growth, as the national conversation about crime and punishment has shifted," said Elizabeth Watts Warren, a lecturer in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department of sociology on the UGA Griffin campus. "Georgia has been at the forefront of that conversation, enacting sweeping criminal justice reforms in 2012 that appear to be paying off as Georgia's prison population has declined each year since the reforms were implemented."

Additional presentations will explore new directions in prosecutions—especially drug offenses, evidence-based strategies to reduce recidivism, innovative practices for strengthening inmates' parental ties, the toll of human trafficking on communities, forensics and the need for broadly trained criminal justice professionals.

The interdisciplinary studies bachelor's degree with concentrations in sociology or psychology offered by the Franklin at the UGA-Griffin campus prepares graduates for a range of careers, including many fields within criminal justice. The conference is free but registration is required. For more details, visit http://www.ugacjday.com.

Kudos, October 2014

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Signing_Reitz.jpgFranklin faculty and students continue to astound with extraordinary achievements and major contributions in scholarship, research and service. As sampling from the past month:

Elizabeth Jean Reitz was among one hundred-sixty four influential artists, scientists, scholars, authors, and institutional leaders who were inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences at a ceremony in Cambridge on Saturday, October 11.

Distinguished Research Professor of Physics and founding Director of the Center for Simulational Physics David Landau has been appointed to the Academic Advisory Council of the University of Heidelberg, Germany.

Wendy Zomlefer, associate professor of plant biology, received $74,385 from the National Science Foundation as part of a $2.5 million collaborative grant comprising 12 institutions, headed by Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina.

Professor of industrial/organizational psychology Kecia Thomas was appointed associate dean for leadership development and diversity for the Franklin College.

Wenxuan Zhong, associate professor in the department of statistics, has been awarded a $1.44 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop predictive statistical models based on epigenetic change patterns.

A national exhibition at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, is highlighting the work of two alumni and one faculty member from the University of Georgia's Lamar Dodd School of Art.

Researchers in the department of psychology have developed a unique method of diagnosing the earliest stages of dementia by applying tasks commonly used to gauge levels of impulsive or risky behaviors related to financial decisions.

Melissa Harshman, associate professor in the Lamar Dodd School of Art and professor of psychology L. Stephen Miller will gain a deeper perspective on modern academic leadership as 2014-2015 SEC Academic Leadership Development Program Fellows.

The Academic Leadership Development Program Fellows program at UGA is part of the broader Academic Leadership Development Program of the Southeastern Conference.

University of Georgia researchers, led by Distinguishex Reseach professor and co-P.I. Michael Pierce have received a five-year $850,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish a glycoscience training program for pre-doctoral graduate students that will help train a new generation of carbohydrate researchers.

A team of students in the department of statistics recently won first place and $5,000 at the national SAS Analytics 2014 Conference in Las Vegas a national competition. The SAS Analytics Shootout Team from UGA is comprised of Wenbo Wu, Hejiao Hu, Linwei Hu, Lina Liao, Fei Liu, Xijue Tan, and Guannan Wang. Congratulations ot the team and faculty advisor Jaxk Reeves.

Image: Elizabeth Jean Reitz, Professor of Anthropology, signs the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ Book of Members, a tradition that dates back to 1780.

University Theatre presents 'The Great Gatsby'

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Great-Gatsby.jpgOne of the blog's favorite American novels and fictional protagonists comes to the Fine Arts Theatre beginning November 6:

University Theatre at the University of Georgia will present "The Great Gatsby," adapted for the stage by Simon Levy from F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel and directed by T. Anthony Marotta, on Nov. 6-8 and 12-14 at 8 p.m. with matinee performances Nov. 9 and 16 at 2:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Theatre.

Additional events surrounding this Spotlight on the Arts feature include a small opening night reception Nov. 6, "A Party with Gatsby" Nov. 7 and a special matinee for area high school groups Nov. 11.

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When Fitzgerald published the novel in 1925, "it was written about and gifted to a generation that, for the first time in America's history, was under the spell of the media," Marotta explained. "Americans were suddenly being supplied with a stream of images depicting how the ‘haves' look and live. We, mostly the ‘have-nots', have been watching closely ever since.

"While the era may look different and seem far away, we have much in common with people in this play, and the expectations they project onto the American Dream."

To make the connection between the past and the present, Marotta's team is creating an immersive experience in which audience members will be offered the option to receive text messages that supplement the action onstage during the performance. There will be a "phone-free" area for patrons that wish to opt out of this supplementary feature of the production.

Spotlight on the Arts, and how. This wonderfully ambitious production will be one of the great highlights not just of this year's festival but of the academic year. Good luck to our students and faculty. Let's come out and enjoy this great effort. Tickets here.

Graduate Acting Ensemble: Danny and the Deep Blue Sea

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Danny.pngThe Graduate Acting Ensemble in the department of theatre and film studies will present a two-night engagement Oct. 21-22 in the Cellar Theatre of the Fine Arts Building - Danny and the Deep Blue Sea by John Patrick Shanley:

A violent maniac and a neglectful mother walk into a bar, but the only punch lines are the scars they carry with them. Danny wants to fight his way out of this vicious world, and Roberta wants punishment for her awful life choices. When they cross paths one night in a dingy Bronx bar, they might be each other's last hope for redemption.

Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door. The production contains adult content and themes, so discretion is advised. The Graduate Acting Ensemble is comprised of MFA students in the department and advised by professor Ray Paolino.

Spotlight on the Arts: Opera Theatre

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2014 spotlight.jpgWe'll be highlighting a few of the upcoming Spotlight on the Arts events, and first but not least is the UGA Opera Theatre production of 'Hansel and Gretel':

 University of Georgia Opera Theatre will present "Hansel and Gretel" in a three-night engagement Nov. 5-7 at 7:30 p.m. in Hodgson Concert Hall.

The performance, part of both the UGA Spotlight on the Arts Festival and the Hugh Hodgson School of Music's 2nd Thursday Scholarship Concert Series, also features the Georgia Children's Chorus, dance department and UGA Symphony Orchestra, conducted by professor Mark Cedel.

The quasi-children's opera is the best-known work of 19th century German composer Engelbert Humperdinck.

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UGA's production of the opera will be sung in English, using a libretto unique to the performance that draws upon several translations. Presented as a fully-staged concert production, the opera features Marisan Corsino as Hansel, Elisabeth Slaten as Gretel, Chalis Montgomery in the dual role of the mother and witch, Isaiah Feken as the father and Alexis Minogue as the Sandman and Dew Fairy, two spirits encountered by the children in the forest.

"Beyond beautiful singing, musical elements, melodies and an understanding of the text, I find the most important element in any opera to be the relationships between characters," Burchinal said. "You can dress things up in all manner of fantastic settings, but the characters' interaction is at the heart of whether or not we believe what is happening in the opera. The goal is to always find a way to create reality onstage."

That's what the spotlight is for - live performance on a stage, with music, costumes, singers and musicians. All with a great story. Come out and support our students and faculty in the Opera Theatre. It's a great experience, with extraordinarily skilled performers in a friendly environment. Step into the Spotlight. #UGASpotlight

Concert on the Lawn, Oct. 17

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The Concert on the Lawn has become a fall tradition on North campus, and the Hodgson Wind Ensemble will present the fifth installment this Friday, Oct. 17 at 12:30 p.m.

Enjoy an hour of good fellowship and fun at this free concert by the Hodgson Wind Ensemble and director of bands Cynthia Johnston Turner!

Begun in 2010, the program includes light classics, patriotic numbers, and beloved marches in the style of old-fashioned band concerts in the park. This year's repertoire includes Glinka's overture to Ruslan & Ludmilla; American classics such as Whistler and His Dog, The Stars & Stripes Forever, 76 Trombones, Circus Bee March, and America, the Beautiful; John WIlliam's famous Olympic Fanfare; Slava! by Leonard Bernstein; and medlies Disney at the Movies, Broadway Spectacular, andSelections from "The Wiz."

The event is free and open to the public—bring your blanket or lawn chair and a picnic lunch!

So much fun - and if you don't believe it, here's a video we made from the 2011 concert. Bring a chair and see you there.