Category: students

Poet Claudia Rankine reading tonight

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ClaudiaRankine_JohnLucas.jpgNational Book Award finalist and former University of Georgia faculty member Claudia Rankine will read from her work Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. at Ciné, 234 W. Hancock Ave. The event, sponsored by the UGA Creative Writing Program in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, is free and open to the public.

The reading is part of VOX, a series organized and hosted by graduate students in creative writing with additional organizational support from Avid Bookshop's Avid Reading Series. Here's an excerpt from [“A father tells his son the thing he regrets most about his life...”] BY CLAUDIA RANKINE

A father tells his son the thing he regrets most about his life is the amount of time he has spent worrying about it.
   Worry 1. A dog’s action of biting and shaking an animal so as to injure or kill it, spec., a hound’s worrying of its quarry; an instance of this. 2. A state or feeling of mental unease or anxiety regarding or arising from one’s cares or responsibilities, uncertainty about the future, fear of failure, etc.; anxious concern, anxiety. Also, an instance or cause of this.
   It achieved nothing, all his worrying. Things worked out or they didn’t work out and now here he was, an old man, an old man who each year of his life bit or shook doubt as if to injure if not to kill, an old man with a good-looking son who resembles his deceased mother. It is uncanny how she rests there, as plain as day, in their boy's face.

Town and gown wins again. Welcome back to Athens, Ms. Rankine, and great job CWP for bringing in this wonderful poet.

Amazing student Omar Martinez-Uribe

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omar_martinezUribe.jpgMeet Amazing UGA student Omar Martinez-Uribe:

a senior biology major from Fayetteville, GA, Uribe has been volunteering in the community, working with student organizations, conducting undergraduate research and representing his college throughout his UGA career. The next step for this avid Bulldog fan is medical school.

...

University highlights, achievements and awards:

After my first semester at UGA I entered the Honors Program through collegiate entry. I began volunteering for the Thomas Lay after-school program my freshman year and tried to make connections with many of the children from Clarke County.

The summer after my freshman year I worked at the UGA-Griffin campus with Patrick McCullough in the crop and soil sciences department. He was a great mentor. I really enjoyed getting to see a different type of scientific work and his experience made my time worthwhile. I even got to translate a few publications into Spanish.

During my sophomore year at UGA I was inducted into Alpha Epsilon Delta, the premedical honor society. I also began working with MEDLIFE. This is an amazing organization that aims to provide medicine, education and development to low-income families. I think it is important for minority students to serve in this type of organization because it is a way to serve as a representative. I enjoyed being a family head with this organization which entailed working with a wonderful group of students dedicated to their community and showing compassion to others.

In addition, I began working with the Student Academic Honesty Council my sophomore year. I believe that a degree from UGA is incredibly valuable, and I work to make sure students know the rules and regulations about academic honesty.

Before my junior year, I began working in the Infectious Disease Department with Julie Moore. I have been moving around on several different projects regarding the mechanisms behind placental malaria. I plan on writing a senior thesis next semester and hopefully can include all of my different projects in this paper!

I have been incredibly fortunate to become a part of the Franklin College ambassadors. We have an amazing coordinator, Roslyn Raley, and such cool student representatives. I have enjoyed many meetings with Dean Dorsey, and I have worked to make sure Franklin’s donors see what an amazing impact they make on all of UGA’s undergraduates. I’ve even had the opportunity to meet President Morehead and a few of Georgia’s lawmakers!

One of the latest things I am incredibly proud of is my participation in the Summer Educational Enrichment Program through Georgia Regents University. I was very fortunate to have been selected to spend seven weeks shadowing and learning from faculty and staff of GRU. I was able to see so many different types of surgeries and procedures, and I really enjoyed my experience. I have made lifelong friends, and I hope to see them as my colleagues in the future.

Fantastic. Read the whole profile.

Dance: Emerging Choreographers Dec. 5 & 6

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YoungChoreographers2014.jpgThe department of dance presents the Emerging Choreographers Informal Showing on Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. and Dec. 6 at 3 p.m. in the New Dance Theatre in the dance building on Sanford Drive:

The showing marks the second performance of the annual fall semester Young Choreographers Series, which premieres choreographic works by UGA dance majors. The works reflect each choreographer's creative process, movement vocabulary and artistic perspective.

"After working all semester conceiving a choreographic idea, developing vocabulary and then crafting that material in space and time with dancers, it is always quite interesting to see the variety of works that manifest," said Rebecca Gose, an associate professor of dance.

The students prepared the pieces within either the Young Choreographers' Lab or Dance Composition I course. The works count toward the students' fulfillment of their bachelor's or bachelor's of fine arts degrees in dance.

Dance remains one of the world's most important art forms and we are fortunate to have such a vibrant program on campus. It's crucial to retain the language of dance and engage its subtle use of movement to express emotion and tell stories, as a performer as well as a spectator. Come celebrate the accomplishments of these student choreographers as you sharpen your appreciation and enjoyment of dance.

Kudos, December 2014

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Uma-Canopy-group.jpgEach month, we are humbled by the achievements of our faculty, staff and students. We list a few of the most recent here not to be boastful (though we are quite proud of your accomplishments) but as a simple acknowledgement: grouping together so many accolades from one college, over a short period of time, reminds us of the talent, productivity and professional engagement of colleagues all around us.

That being said, the month just past brought an exemplary set of outstanding achievements that is so extraordinary, I didn't want them to get lost in the fact that we regulalry spotlight such awards and accolades. We do, and there is nothing ordinary about any of them. But there's no way to soft-pedal it - this is greatness in action:

A group of scientists led by Samantha Joye received $18.8 million in new funding to continue its studies of natural oil seeps and to track the impacts of the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem

Three UGA faculty members (all from the Franklin College) have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an honor bestowed upon them by their peers for "scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. The three are dean Alan Dorsey, Samantha Joye and David Garfinkel

A delegation of seven undergraduate students representing UGA at the 18th Annual Southeast Model African Union simulation at Clayton State University won the best delegation award - faculty advisors Karim Traore and Akinloye Ojo

The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching selected John A. Knox as the Georgia Professor of the Year for 2014. Knox was the first state winner of the award from UGA since 2004 and the first atmospheric scientist from any state to be selected since 1989.

The Georgia Debate Union won an intercollegiate debate tournament featuring 32 teams from East Coast colleges

Doctoral student Uma Nagendra (pictured above) flipped and twisted her way to the top prize in the seventh annual Dance Your Ph.D. contest for her video explaining biology research through an aerial dance performance

And to preview the upcoming fall Commencement exercises on Dec. 19 at Stegman Coliseum, UGA Alumnus, associate director of programs for the NASA Ames Research Center and great friend of the Franklin College Roger Hunter will deliver the undergraduate commencement address. The graduate commencement will feature UGA Foundation Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Gregory H. Robinson.

Happy Thanksgiving

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OC_rear.jpgWith campus very quiet (though not nearly as leafy as in the photo above), the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences wishes everyone a very Happy Thanksgiving. Safe travels and great time with family and friends to all of our students, staff and faculty. 

See you next week.

UGA Holiday Concert Dec. 4 and 5

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Holiday-Concerts.jpgThe great tradition afforded by a campus symphony orchestra and dynamic choral program returns with the UGA Holiday Concert preformances Dec. 4 & 5 in Hugh Hodgson Concert Hall:

The concert brings together hundreds of student musicians from the Hugh Hodgson School of Music for an evening of seasonal selections by the UGA Symphony Orchestra, British Brass Band, Jazz Band and choirs.

"These concerts are one of the events that usher in the holiday season here in Athens," said Dale Monson, Hodgson School director. "They occupy a special place in our hearts and in university life."

The 2014 Holiday Concert is sponsored by Sylvia Harley Arant and Dolly and Bill Barstow.

Tickets for the program, part of the Hugh Hodgson School of Music's 2nd Thursday Scholarship Concert Series, are $25 for the general public and $5 for students. For tickets, call the UGA Performing Arts Center box office at 706-542-4400 or see www.uga.edu/pac.

An uplifting of all that is the best of the holiday season, this concert is not to be missed. Perfect for finding that festive mood sure to last all season, start your own tradition with family at the UGA Holiday Concert.

UGA wins best delegation at SE Model African Union

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UGATeam MAU.jpgOutstanding accomplishment by this group of UGA undergraduates:

A delegation of seven undergraduate students representing the University of Georgia at the 18th Annual Southeast Model African Union simulation at Clayton State University won the best delegation award recently.

The UGA students represented the African nation of Burkina Faso at the program. As the winning team, they will compete at the National Model African Union held in February at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

The SEMAU simulation is a student-centered undertaking designed to help students gain valuable knowledge of diplomatic codes of behavior as well as enhance their leadership aptitude. The simulation exposes students to a wide array of issues relating to Africa, including political, economic, socio-cultural, security as well as environmental matters. It contributes to students' understanding of the capabilities and limitations governments in Africa face in dealing with various challenges.

...

The UGA team members, their hometowns and majors, were: 
• Tifara Brown, Ocilla, management information systems and international business 
• Sainabou Jallow, Sugar Hill, international affairs and economics
• Lisa Traore, Bayreuth, Germany, international affairs and German
• Rita Ebhaleme, Loganville, international affairs
• Tyler Smith, Decatur, journalism
• Ryan Kelley, Conyers, international affairs
• Faisal Gedi, Stone Mountain, computer systems engineering and management information systems

Congratulations all, and especially to their faculty advisors Akinloye Ojo and Karim Traore.

Image: UGA students, Left to right: Ryan Kelley, Sainabou Jallow, Tifara Brown, Rita Ebhaleme, Lisa Traore, and Tyler Smith (Faisal Gedi, not pictured)

First-Year Odyssey: an intro to careers

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FYO_vet.jpgIn a query in the form of a comment to a recent post, a prosective UGA student asked about the Franklin College and what role, as a prospective veterinary student, Franklin would play in their education. It's a good question.

A very significant role, actually. Aside from its importance to the core curriculum for a host of majors beyond Franklin, preparing students for study in a wide variety of fields and professional schools, the arts and sciences educate us about society in a way that will impact everything we do, whatever our field. The First-Year Odyssey program offers a case in point on this experience:

First-Year Odyssey seminars are designed to introduce students to academic life at UGA, allowing them to engage with faculty and other first-year students in a small class environment. 
In this seminar, Ward, a professor of internal medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine and chief medical officer for small animal medicine, asks students to explore how pets are part of society and what responsibility people have to their pets. But the course also gives students a chance to see and interact with animals.
There were plenty of adoring "oohs" and "ahs" from the class of 15 students as they toured the existing Veterinary Teaching Hospital with Ward and got to see animals of various sizes receiving treatment. The students were especially excited in the large animal wing of the hospital when they found a sick calf taking solace with its mother in a stall.
But the tour wasn't just about looking at sick animals. Students also were introduced to the wide-ranging specialties in veterinary medicine. Ward said there are nearly as many medical specialties in treating animals as there are in people medicine-including cardiology, anesthesiology, orthopedics and neurology.
While one function of the class is to get students to think deeply about human-animal interaction in society, it's also an opportunity for students to explore careers that deal with animals. 
Elizabeth Davis, a biological science major from Adairsville, grew up on a farm with chickens, goats and horses. She is considering career options with animals beyond being a veterinarian.
As she has found out in the class, there are many options.
"I've learned a lot about being a vet and other careers," she said.

Precisely so. Hands-on experience with a variety of subject matter allows students to think broadly about their future, even if they have already decided on a career. Refining our ideas about what we want to do and the best route for our talents is one of the great luxuries [and responsibilities] students enjoy at UGA. The Franklin College plays a crucial role in thse opportunities, providing the space and breadth of faculty expertise for your imagination to roam - and your perceptions to sharpen.

Transgender Awareness Week

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The transgender community is an important constituency that helps inform institutional diversity efforts on campus - not unlike many other groups on campus. Where they differ significantly from other groups, however, is the threat of violence that transgender individuals face on a far too consistent basis. To bring added attention to this situation, the University of Georgia Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center will observe Transgender Awareness Week with several events Nov. 18-20:

Transgender activist Luna Merbruja will conduct a workshop titled "Liberation From The Margins: How To Fight Racial, Gender, and Queer Violence" on Nov. 18 at 2 p.m. in Room 141 of the Tate Student Center. The workshop will focus on the struggles and violence that queer, transgender and/or people of color face in their homes, workplaces and intimate relationships.

Participants will be given an opportunity to share their experiences of survival, resistance and strategies to address violence, as well as skill sharing to create communities that support one another.

Merbruja will deliver a keynote monologue at 6:30 p.m. in Room B2 of the main library. The performance will be dedicated to the memory of activist Sylvia Rivera and other transgender women of color who fought for liberation.

The performance will illustrate how four decades of resilience has created a platform for queer and transgender liberation to permeate mainstream culture, in which there are visible queer and transgender people of color on news channels, in network series, in magazines and on the New York Times Best Seller list.

See the link for information on more events this week. The LGBT Resource Center does important work in our campus community and the Franklin College supports all efforts to make our community more inclusive. Take advantage of some of these wonderful opportunities this week to learn, acknowledge and celebrate.

Georgia Debate Union wins Virginia tournament

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Feinberg_Boyce_0.jpgA two-person UGA team-Amy Feinberg of Canton, an international affairs and public relations major, and Tucker Boyce of Alpharetta, an economics major - compiled a 9-1 record and emerged victorious at an intercollegiate debate tournament featuring 32 teams from East Coast colleges hosted by Liberty University in early November. The competition included teams from Boston College, Emory University, University of Florida, Georgetown University, University of Kentucky, University of Minnesota, U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Naval Academy, Vanderbilt University and Wake Forest University.

This was Feinberg and Boyce's fourth tournament of the season. They have compiled an overall record of 23-12. Their next tournament will be at Wake Forest University, typically the largest intercollegiate debate competition of the fall semester.

"It was great to see Amy and Tucker win a tournament that attracted some of the best debate programs on the East Coast," said Edward Panetta, professor of communication studies and director of the Georgia Debate Union. "They have worked hard with their coaches since early August, and it paid off with a string of solid victories.

"Any time a team wins nine of 10 debates at one tournament, it is a significant accomplishment."

Feinberg and Boyce defeated teams from Florida, Wake Forest and Georgetown on their way to victory. Feinberg also was recognized as the sixth best speaker at the tournament. Congratulations - great job, great students.